Facebook wants to prevent porn revenge before it happens

The social network wants potential victims to take a proactive approach to prevent the release of their photos.

Revenge porn kills millions of people every year. According to Mashable, after Facebook launched in April 2017 a new tool to report these private photos released without the consent of the contacts, this fall it will further develop by launching a pilot program responsible for discovering these photos before they are released.

So far, to delete a photo, it has to be tagged by the user, verified by a Facebook member and the complaint verified by them. The snapshot is then “quarantined” and social network algorithms ensure that the snapshot is not uploaded to its page again.

The new method allows people who are concerned about an intimate photo of themselves to appear online and report it to their country’s “eSafety” office in order to stop any attempts to upload to social networks. As a result, Facebook’s algorithms learn to recognize sexually explicit images so you can reject them even before posting. But the Australian Financial Review explained that, to do so, it must leave a trail on the photo and send potential victims to the social media team via Messenger. Facebook claims not to keep the photos, and Internet users will have to remove them from the messaging app.

Related Content: Twitter in turn prohibits “porn revenge” on its site

First test in Australia

Antigone Davis, Facebook’s head of security, said it was the number one in the world. She added: “These tools were developed in collaboration with global security experts, and this is an example of how we use new technologies to ensure the safety of people and prevent injuries.”

The pilot is currently being tested in Australia and will soon be tested in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. If Facebook chose Australia, it was because the organization worked with the government there to launch a portal to report cases of inappropriate images and cyber harassment that relied on the “electronic security” office, and the country was particularly active on revenge porn.

In France, convicted persons face up to two years in prison and a fine of € 60,000.

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